2017-01-07

The best way to make 1 Million golden Fish big eye how to Care Feeding a...

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The best way to make 1 Million golden Fish big eye how to Care Feeding and Breeding in your aquarium

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Get a large enough tank. The minimum tank size for one goldfish is 10-15 US gallons (56.7 liters)(Remember, they grow to about 10-12 inches (25.5-30.5 centimeters), and sometimes over!) and you will need to add 10 U.S. gallons (37.8 liters) onto that for each additional goldfish. Do your research about all different kinds of goldfish. Common goldfish, comet goldfish, and other single tail goldfish need ponds or huge tanks as they can grow up to a foot or more in length. Do not get single tails unless you have a 180 US gallon (681.4 liter) tank laying around or a pond into which you can transition them when they get too large.

For decades goldfish were touted as being able to live in small bowls, and thus why they have a reputation of having short life spans. However, goldfish can actually live as long as a dog! Without enough filtration, ammonia builds up quickly in such a small space and the environment becomes toxic.

Goldfish will grow to match the amount of space available. However, you are not required to grow them to their full potential. Your one-inch goldfish can potentially grow to the size of your arm--but would only likely to do that if you own a large pond or professional aquarium.

2

Set up the aquarium first, before you buy the fish. It takes some time and care to set up a proper goldfish habitat. As mentioned below, there are quite a few steps to make sure the water and overall living conditions are good for the fish.

Fish are sensitive creatures that get stressed from going from one environment to another. Too much change too quickly can actually kill the fish even if the environment is ideal. Do not keep transferring your fish from one container to another.

Goldfish cannot live in small temporary environments (such as a plastic bag or small bowl) for very long. An hour is fine, several hours not very good, a day or so maximum for a small water container.

In an emergency, a large plastic bucket, rinsed well and with water treated with water conditioner works well.

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Use gravel that will not get stuck in your fish's throat. Goldfish are particularly prone to getting aquarium gravel caught in their mouths. Use either large gravel (too big to swallow) or very small gravel. Large gravel is better for goldfish because it will not get caught in their throat and because goldfish like to be able to dig into the gravel to search for fallen food.

Be sure to clean your gravel before you put it into the tank. Many aquarium gravels require rinsing, or your aquarium will be cloudy or dirty. Even if you have just bought it, a good rinse and soak in some water for a day will draw out some of the impurities and help ensure that your goldfish are getting the best environment to flourish in. Make sure to not use soap.

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Make sure your tank has some scenery and light. Goldfish are diurnal which means they are active during the day. They need light to maintain a healthy wake/sleep cycle. There is also evidence that light is necessary to keep your fish's colors bright.[1][2] Fish that can't sleep well or aren't getting enough sunlight are going to lose their color and become dull. Keep your aquarium lit for around 8-12 hours each day to replicate a healthy day/night cycle if it does not receive natural sunlight. Never put your tank in direct sunlight, either, as this could cause large temperature fluctuations and contribute to rampant algae growth.

Think about putting a rock or wood centerpiece with some artificial greenery into your aquarium. The rock or wood will give the goldfish nooks and crannies to explore and the artificial plants won't accelerate plant growth in your tank. Goldfish thrive with minimal decoration. They are typically chubby and poor swimmers, so having fewer obstacles means they can swim more freely. Consider having one medium to large statement piece in the center of the tank and a few plastic plants located outside of the swimming pattern to give your fish the most usable space.

Real plants are beneficial because they help absorb some of the ammonia, nitrites and nitrates that accumulates in the aquarium because of waste and natural wear and tear. However, goldfish are omnivores and voracious eaters. Stick with artificial plants until you have the time and resources to keep real plants safe from hungry goldfish.

Be sure that any decorations you choose aren't hollow (it's a breeding ground for potentially harmful bacteria) and that they don't have sharp edges (your fish might tear its fins).

Try using fluorescent lights for your goldfish. Halogen lights and incandescent lights will also do. Pay attention to how much light you give them — goldfish will appreciate 12 hours of light and 12 hours of darkness.

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Rig up a water filter. Goldfish need a filter. A water filter should have 3 stages: Mechanical, for removing large particles such as fish waste or excess food; chemical, for removing odors, discolorations, and other organics; and biological, to break down fish waste and ammonia with beneficial bacteria. It should also be rated for the size of your tank. If your tank is on the borderline between two sized filters, it is usually better to go with the larger filter. Having clean water and a functional, efficient filtration device will keep your goldfish content and healthy. There are three very popular kinds of filters:

Hang on back (HOB) filters, which hang on the rim of your tank, and bring water in and filter water out. They are very popular, reasonably priced, and probably give you the most bang for your buck.

Canister filters sit underneath your aquarium and use a series of tubes to filter water in and out. Canister filters tend to be almost silent, are a little pricier than HOB filters, but tend to be more efficient at filtering than HOBs. Canister Filters are also typically made for tanks in excess of 50gal (About 189 Liters), and so are usually not available for smaller tanks.

Wet/Dry filters use an overflow box to filter out impurities. Wet/Dry filters, however, are significantly bigger than HOBs or canisters, and so generally only fit into aquariums that hold at least 50 gallons (189.2 liters).

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Fill the tank with water. When you get your tank, fill it with tap water that has been treated with an appropriate water conditioning solution. Or, you could use distilled water.

Untreated tap water or drinking water has chemicals and minerals that could harm the fish.

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Go through at least one fish-less cycle before introducing your goldfish. A fish-less cycle involves adding ammonia to a tank and keeping track of the nitrate levels to make sure the water is safe for your goldfish to live in. Sadly, many fish die once introduced into a new tank because of ammonia and nitrate poisoning. Make sure that you add dechlorinator, because the chlorine in tap water will kill your fish.

Before you add your fish, you'll need to make sure the environment is fish-ready. Pick up a pH test kit and test the tank for the right amount of ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate levels. You want zero ammonia, zero nitrite, and less than 20 nitrate as your end result. Test strips can be difficult to use correctly, and tend to be more expensive, so get a liquid test kit like the API Master Test Kit.

What's going to happen is you'll start adding drops of ammonia continuously. That'll start the nitrite process going. If you keep doing what you're doing, eventually you'll see nitrates which are consumed by algae or plants. When you've done a lap, it's fish time!

Part

2

Upkeep and Feeding

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Add your fish. Hopefully, if you have more than one goldfish, your goldfish are all the same type. Unfortunately, goldfish are known to eat other, smaller fish, and can overeat, keeping food from their peers. If another fish is smaller or slower, it doesn't stand a chance. You can use a commercially available tank divider to keep your “bully” or weaker fish apart from the other(s).

Goldfish can be decent "community tank" fish. However, good roommates need to be selected carefully. White Cloud Mountain Minnows or Zebra Danios are good choices, and so are Plecos. However: These fish live in schools, so if you're buying extra fish, you need to at least buy an extra half dozen. So in short: Keep your goldfish with other similar goldfish.

Any new fish brought into an established aquarium should be quarantined for two weeks beforehand. If they have any diseases, you don't want those spread to your healthy fish!

Keep in mind that goldfish like colder water than most community fish, so any other species you add to the tank should be hearty. (You could also consider adding a goldfish to a tank with overly-productive livebearers to eat the unwanted offspring and keep your fish numbers in check.)

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Clean the aquarium at least once every week. even if it doesn't look dirty. Goldfish produce waste that even your water filter may not be entirely able to remove. A clean tank means happy, healthy goldfish. And a happy, healthy goldfish can live for decades![3] Soap is poisonous to fish and will kill them quickly, so don't wash your tank with soap. Also, don't use regular tap water to put in your tank. Drinkable water is not good for them because it takes out some of the minerals which are good for goldfish. Buy a water conditioner at a pet store and put in the amount it says on the label.

Avoid removing the fish from the tank when you clean. Using a gravel vacuum to soak up debris can be done without extracting the fish from their habitat. If you have to remove the fish, for whatever reason, use a plastic container instead of a net, if possible. Nets can injure goldfish fins more easily than containers can. They are also scared of nets and can cause them stress.[4]

Perform a 25% water change weekly assuming you have stocked your tank properly. Do a 50% water change whenever the nitrates reach 20. It can help to have a few old towels around for this messy process. Just be careful not to vacuum up any teeny fish while you're changing the water.

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Measure for ammonia, nitrite, and pH. Remember that test you did before you added your precious little fish? You gotta keep that up! Ammonia and nitrite levels should be at 0. A range of pH 6.5-8.25 is fine. wallpaper photo model fashion fashionweek photographer popularphoto hairstylist makeup instagood bestoftheday photooftheday day likes good female world beauty art style photos amazing bride travel camera canon nikon vacation happy farm love nature naturelovers hd for #photo #model #fashion #fashionweek #photographer #popularphoto #hairstylist #makeup #instagood #bestoftheday #photooftheday #day #likes #good #female #world #beauty #art #style #photos #amazing #bride #travel #camera #canon #nikon #vacation #happy #farm #love #nature #naturelovers